News at Cranlana

Read recent news about our organisation, along with published articles written by our staff and alumni interviews

ethical decision-making

How COVID-19 Is Creating New Ethical Dilemmas For Business Leaders

Ethical business leadership has become more important than ever in an era of social media and consumers that are willing to vote with their wallets.

Whether an issue of discrimination, sexual harassment, environmental damage or financial misconduct, allegations of unethical behaviour within a business can destroy years – even decades – of built-up community trust.

Now, the COVID-19 pandemic is creating new ethical dilemmas for business leaders and managers.

Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership CEO Vanessa Pigrum and Steven Ronson, Fair Work Ombudsman Executive Director for Enforcement and alumnus of the Executive Colloquium program, highlight the importance of ethical decision-making for leadership teams and boards.

via Adelaide Advertiser, 15 September 2020

housing

It’s time for the feds to rebuild the economy by building social housing

A $7.7 billion investment to build 30,000 homes and repair thousands more would raise economic output by $15.7 billion.

Peter Mares, Cranlana Centre’s Lead Moderator, says that as we mark the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, the pandemic calls for a level of nation building ambition similar to 1945 — when the urgent need to build housing as part of post-war reconstruction forged the first 10-year Commonwealth-state housing agreement.

In the subsequent decades housing policy involved similar agreements, with the federal government funding the states to build social housing. Over the past 25 years we have dropped the ball. Now is the time to pick it up again.

via Crikey Inq, 31 August 2020

housing

Housing for all makes “good business sense”

The second of a 12-part series CBD News is running, attempting to explore the role that housing can and should play within Australian society and why it is important to our economy that we house all Australians, rich or poor. Peter Mares, author of “No Place Like Home” and lead moderator at the Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, was asked to share his thoughts on why housing all Australians should be considered an economic imperative for Australia.

via CBD News, 27 August 2020

Belinda Duarte

Banding Together To Create Change

Belinda Duarte is the CEO of Culture is Life, an organisation pushing forward Indigenous-led solutions to lower the rate of youth suicide. She’s also the recipient of the 2020 Chief Executive Women Vincent Fairfax Fellowship scholarship.

As a proud Wotjobaluk and Dja Dja Wurrung woman, Duarte points to the first time she experienced racism as a child, and how it woke her up to the inherent challenges and disadvantages Aboriginal people faced in their country compared to their white counterparts.

Since then, she has drawn on the strength and experience of her elders past and present, and her community, to inform her leadership and achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

via PROBono, 24 August 2020

post covid leadership

Leadership skills for a post-COVID world

How can leaders dealing with the COVID crisis lay the foundations for success in a post-COVID world?

COVID has turned our world upside down. With no certain end in sight, structural, strategic and psychological change is constantly on our minds. And for executives, managers and anyone who leads a team, the complexity of the decision-making being asked of us right now is, dare I say, unprecedented.

At the same time as leading our organisations through the immediate crisis, we need to lay the foundations to ensure success in our post-COVID life (date TBC), make tough business decisions for now and the future, manage complex risk factors we don’t fully understand, and lead our people with compassion and fairness. It’s a tough gig.

Cranlana Centre CEO Vanessa Pigrum explores the leadership skills required.

via Acuity Magazine, 12 August 2020

Homelessness Week

Beyond Shelter

As the Covid-19 pandemic set in, state and territory governments around Australia rapidly found crisis accommodation — usually in hotels — for around 7000 people who were sleeping rough. But the impressive speed and resolve raised a difficult question: what happens next?

The federal government has a unique opportunity to begin reshaping Australia’s housing landscape in the October budget. Lead Moderator Peter Mares explores what lessons we can learn from Finland’s successful adoption of the ‘housing first’ model.

Inside Story, 4 August 2020

leadership conversations

Leadership Conversations

While books, podcasts and videos on the subject of leadership abound, what they don’t provide is the opportunity to test and challenge yourself with peers. Being able to openly share perspectives on, insights into and doubts about their leadership practice expands and deepens their understanding of the stakeholders, systems and communities within which they operate. For leaders to whom ethical considerations and principles are important, these kinds of conversations are particularly valuable.

Do the Salons in the tradition of the European literary and philosophical movements offer a model for conversation which meets these needs?

via ArtsHub, 29 July 2020

philosophy of friendship

Philosophy of Friendship

Cranlana’s programs draw on more than 2,000 years of philosophy, spanning both ancient and contemporary critical thinkers, because the fundamental concepts grappled with, such the nature of friendship, remain constant. Here are three pieces which consider the philosophy of friendship, specifically Aristotle’s thoughts on the three types of love – agape, eros, and philia — which endure as an insightful model for illuminating the nature of our relationships.

Top 20 Ethical Leadership Sites

Top 20 Ethical Leadership Sites in 2020

Completing a Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership program is just the start of a lifelong connection with Cranlana.

Cranlana regularly publishes articles, podcasts and videos on its site to supplement and extend our programs’ readings and conversations. They include pieces authored by our alumni, CEO Vanessa Pigrum and Lead Moderator Peter Mares, and curated content on leadership and ethics drawn from a range of sources. These pieces are designed to support alumni in their professional lives by providing useful perspectives to feed into their thinking, and offering an alternate lens through which to consider current issues and events. From AI to animals rights, Black Lives Matter to ethical practice in a pandemic, the topics covered touch on all areas of public and personal life. The pieces aren’t exclusive to alumni – they also provide a repository of thinking on ethical considerations, leadership practice and philosophy for anyone interested in these topics. Which is why the Cranlana Centre site has been named one of the Top 20 Ethical Leadership sites to follow in 2020.

female political leaders

Research Shows Countries With Female Leaders Have Far Fewer COVID Deaths

A new study has revealed countries with male leaders who have prioritised the economy in their COVID-19 response have seen many more deaths from the virus than countries with female leaders who have focused on public health.

In their report, the authors argue there are “both contingent and structural reasons that may explain these stark differences”.

Vanessa Pigrum, CEO of Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, has some thoughts on why this might be the case.

“These women have, like all leaders, had to make difficult decisions quickly, in an unprecedented and rapidly changing situation,” says Pigrum. “These decisions have had enormous consequences. They’ve slowed the spread of the virus and saved lives, but in doing so have economically impacted millions of people. Acknowledging these hardships with emotional courage, communicating with clarity and empathy, and calmly engaging in an authentic way with their constituents engenders public confidence.”

While an ability to maintain integrity throughout turmoil is certainly not unique to female leadership, Pigrum suggests how these female leaders got to be where they are may have affected their leadership style. “The traits of ethical leadership are the same regardless of gender or age, but the expression of those traits might be affected by whether those leaders followed a traditional path to authority,” she says.

via MindFood, 21 July 2020

2020 Lowitja Institute Cranlana Award winner -Professor Roianne West

The Lowitja Institute has named leading Aboriginal academic Professor Roianne West as the winner of the 2020 Lowitja Institute Cranlana Award for outstanding research leadership.

The national award honours excellence from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers whose contributions to their academic field are recognised nationally and internationally, and who have contributed significantly to the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Congratulations Professor West, we look forward to welcoming you to the Executive Colloquium.

democracy

Democracy Can Never Be Sublet

In a poll last month 45% of Australians said the main purpose of our democracy is ensuring all people are treated fairly and equally, including the most vulnerable. Which is why, says Travers McLeod, CEO Centre for Policy Development and Cranlana moderator, Australians are uneasy about outsourcing essential services.

Recent history hasn’t been good for outsourced services, from quarantine hotels to the aged care sector, so as we face the biggest labour market disruption in a generation government needs to be an active player in service delivery.

via The Australian, 13 July 2020

Peter McMullin

Walking Away From Omelas

Alumnus Peter McMullin, a successful lawyer, businessman and philanthropist, knows the impact a Cranlana program can have on participants. During his participation in an Executive Colloquium he had something of an epiphany which pointed him “in a direction I ultimately would have gone on one day anyway, but it really spurred me into action.” With an interest in global human rights and the arts, Peter was active in philanthropy at the time, but the Cranlana program was a turning point and a trigger for his future philanthropy.

via Fundraising and Philanthropy Magazine, 15 July 2020

Closing The (Effectiveness) Gap

Lead Moderator Peter Mares talks with alumnus Romlie Mokak about the new strategy being developed by the Productivity Commission for evaluating policies and programs affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

via Inside Story, 2 July 2020

ethical principles

How To Handle An Ethical Dilemma in the Workplace

“A crisis can…tempt people to suspend or apply different values in response to the changed circumstances, but the innovation and nimbleness required should be based on a constant moral framework. In a crisis your values are your strength.” CEO Vanessa Pigrum talks about how to address ethical dilemmas in the workplace, particularly during times of crisis and uncertainty.

via news.com.au, 2 July 2020

Making good decisions in the grey zone.

The pandemic has brought grey-zone dilemmas into focus, but in truth they are always with us. Thankfully, rules, guidelines and codes of conduct make many everyday choices clear— I don’t have to think about what side of the road to drive on or what speed to drive at. But it is impossible to devise a rule to cover every situation, nor would it be desirable to do so.

Doing a good job of being human requires us to develop the capacity to make good judgements, both in our work and in our personal life. It is a capacity that is enhanced by being open to new information and to different points of view. It is a capacity that requires us to be alert to our tendency to make decisions that benefit us personally, even when we are convinced that we are being entirely objective.

via Profile magazine, June 2020

ethical fade

How To Do Right When Things Go Wrong

Uncertainty is often twinned with speed, and the product can sometimes be poor decisions. Yet organisations seeking to make consistent and coherent decisions face a veritable flood of ethical decision-making models to choose from.

Authors Marc Thompson, Academic Director, Executive Master in Consulting and Coaching for Change, and Peter Collins, Program Director, Vincent Fairfax Fellowship at Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, suggest when making ethical decisions in times of crisis, leaders consider three things: ethical fading; how to test your quandary; and the lessons of behavioural ethics.

Anchoring values, fostering your ethical DNA, and the pub test

Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership CEO Vanessa Pigrum, talks to host Alex Proimos in this episode of Market Narratives, a podcast series that features unorthodox conversations with thought leaders influencing the world of fiduciary investors.

leadership strategies

Effective leadership strategies

Business leaders, including Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership CEO Vanessa Pigrum, talk about effective leadership strategies and approaches, particularly during the uncertainty caused by COVID-19. What are the strategies they and their teams are using to move forward? These twelve leaders from different sectors canvas themes of transparency, clear communication, innovation, collaboration and compassion.

via Dynamic Business, 10 June 2020

Queen’s Birthday Honours 2020

This year eighteen Cranlana Centre alumni were awarded Queen’s Birthday Honours, recognising their contribution to building a just, prosperous and sustainable society. We offer our warmest congratulations to each on these well deserved awards.

black lives matter, racism

Black Lives Matter

We at Cranlana stand alongside the indigenous community of Australia and the Black Lives Matter movement. Like millions of others, we have watched the events triggered by George Floyd’s death with grief, but alarmingly not with surprise. George Floyd’s asphyxiation was a shocking and despicable event, underscored by systemic problems which underpin the societies we live in. Here at home, more than 400 indigenous Australians have died in custody since 1991. Government enquiries and royal commissions have followed. And yet, seemingly nothing changes. The global reactions to George Floyd’s death have highlighted how pervasive systemic biases are. They’re built into the fabric of how we operate – into our economies, our laws and our philosophies. Cranlana Centre commits to using our position to challenge and change these systems; to seek out, learn from and amplify voices which haven’t had access to power; not to let this moment be yet another brief flare of emotion which precedes a return to normal; and to work alongside the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to turn good intentions about change into sustained action. We have always had a commitment to bringing about positive change. Yet we know we can do more. This moment is a wake-up call for all of us who can influence systemic change to do so, however you can.

You can find here a list of resources for a deeper understanding of systemic injustice

9 June 2020

housing

Housing the Australian Nation: Melbourne

The COVID-19 virus has exposed the failings of Australia’s housing system like never before: rough sleeping and homelessness, the insecurity and stress of renting, especially on a low income, and a boom-bust cycle that either pushes house prices up too quickly or down too fast. Our housing mess can be measured in lost productivity, poor health, high debt and growing inequality.

Peter Mares, Cranlana’s Lead Moderator and author of No Place Like Home: Repairing Australia’s Housing Crisis, visits four capital cities, to investigate what’s gone wrong with housing in Australia, and what we might do about it.

via ABC, 30 May 2020

Female Leaders Praised For Their Handling Of The Coronavirus Crisis

What do New Zealand, Germany, Taiwan, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Denmark have in common? When it comes to the coronavirus crisis, there are two things they share – their leaders have been praised for their handling of it, and those leaders are all women.

Vanessa Pigrum, CEO of Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, believes the success of these countries’ response to the pandemic highlights the benefits of diversity. “We need leaders drawn from a wider field than has traditionally been the case, to bring with them a new perspective and fresh approach to persistent issues, and brand-new challenges,” she says. “The pandemic has swept away many assumptions about entrenched systems and challenged accepted thinking in a range of spheres. It’s also shown us that what people need in a crisis can be met by a range of leadership styles which offer more than we’ve been offered to date.”

via Mindfood, 2 June 2020