Posts Tagged ‘values’

archaeology ethics

Human bones tell stories that would otherwise be lost to history. But archaeologists are increasingly confronted with demands to let past generations rest in peace.

The ethical debate surrounding archaeologists unearthing and studying human remains is one of long-standing.

In this article Mark Strauss asks why we care so much about the rights of the dead, who, by virtue of their non-living status, have no apparent opinion on the matter?

via National Geographic, 7 April 2016

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fractured workforce

How do leaders bring together a physically and psychologically fractured workforce? Compassion and humanity will be key at all levels.
Organisations of all sizes and across all sectors and regions have such a disparity of employee experiences of the pandemic that creating a sense of “oneness” is a formidable task.
Pre-existing schisms have been made more visible and more profound by this crisis. But beyond that, the average workforce will contain a vast spectrum of pandemic experiences.
This uniqueness of experience challenges the concept of fairness. How can you be fair and consistent when the spectrum of needs varies so dramatically? Should you even try?

Fast Company, 18 July 2020

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Homelessness Week

As the Covid-19 pandemic set in, state and territory governments around Australia rapidly found crisis accommodation — usually in hotels — for around 7000 people who were sleeping rough. But the impressive speed and resolve raised a difficult question: what happens next?

The federal government has a unique opportunity to begin reshaping Australia’s housing landscape in the October budget. Lead Moderator Peter Mares explores what lessons we can learn from Finland’s successful adoption of the ‘housing first’ model.

Inside Story, 4 August 2020

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philosophy

Where our scientific knowledge is insufficient and where theological answers fail to compel and convince us, philosophy remains a useful endeavour.

That doesn’t mean that all philosophising done at the frontier is useful, interesting, or worth listening to, however. Philosophy that is ignorant of science, or of the bizarre and arcane logical rules that science can often follow, will lead even the most brilliant of thinkers astray. To the speculative, curious mind, however, what is known today will never be satisfactory. Until science makes those critical advances, philosophising will be a necessary tool for gazing beyond today’s frontier.

Which is why Cranlana’s programs draw on more than two millennia of philosophical thinking to foster in-depth, practical discussions that sharpen critical reasoning and strengthen moral courage.

Forbes, 30 June 2020

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remote working

How do leaders considering what work after the pandemic looks like for their organisation ensure that the model they create brings together the best of the virtual and real worlds for the organisation and its staff?

In early 2020 the world began what is undoubtedly the largest work-from-home experiment in history. Now, as countries reopen but Covid-19 remains a major threat, organisations are wrestling with whether and how to have workers return to their offices. Business leaders need to be able to answer a number of questions to make these decisions. Among them is “What impact has working from home had on productivity and creativity?”

Harvard Business Review, 15 July 2020

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