Posts Tagged ‘slavery’

black lives matter, racism

We at Cranlana stand alongside the indigenous community of Australia and the Black Lives Matter movement. Like millions of others, we have watched the events triggered by George Floyd’s death with grief, but alarmingly not with surprise. George Floyd’s asphyxiation was a shocking and despicable event, underscored by systemic problems which underpin the societies we live in. Here at home, more than 400 indigenous Australians have died in custody since 1991. Government enquiries and royal commissions have followed. And yet, seemingly nothing changes. The global reactions to George Floyd’s death have highlighted how pervasive systemic biases are. They’re built into the fabric of how we operate – into our economies, our laws and our philosophies. Cranlana Centre commits to using our position to challenge and change these systems; to seek out, learn from and amplify voices which haven’t had access to power; not to let this moment be yet another brief flare of emotion which precedes a return to normal; and to work alongside the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to turn good intentions about change into sustained action. We have always had a commitment to bringing about positive change. Yet we know we can do more. This moment is a wake-up call for all of us who can influence systemic change to do so, however you can.

You can find here a list of resources for a deeper understanding of systemic injustice

9 June 2020

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“The question really is not whether we’ll be tied to the somethings of our past, but whether we are courageous enough to be tied to the whole of them.” In his opening statement in the US to a House hearing on H.R. 40, a bill that would establish a commission to study reparations, Ta-nehisi Coates’ argument that ‘Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole’ has resonance in Australia, and will be familiar to Executive Colloquium participants who grapple with the realities, responsibilities and consequences of slavery and civil rights through the writings of Gribble, Martin Luther King, Jr and Stan Grant, among others.

The Atlantic, 19 June 2019

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