Posts Tagged ‘science’

bio-ethics research

Bioethicists often refer to four basic ethical principles when evaluating the merits and difficulties of medical procedures and research – autonomy, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence. What happens when you’re not sure whether the research you’re doing is breaching one or more of the bio-ethics principles?

Big Think, 23 October 2019

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AI driverless cars machine learning

Autonomous cars will be required to make value judgments which must be pre-programmed. What should we tell them to do? To understand decisions human drivers would make before determining the ethical decisions that cars should make, researchers crowdsourced the question by launching a game called Moral Machine in which players are presented with a version of the trolley problem. The results suggest that if billions of driverless cars in the future are all programmed to make the same judgement call, it may be a lot more dangerous for some people to cross the street than others.

The New Yorker, 24 January 2019

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climate change science

Emilie Prattico offers a framework for action on climate change – justice and deliberation are as important as the science. “While the requirement for scientific and technical expertise about climate change cannot be denied, there are ways to reconcile this reality with the needs for inclusive, democratic processes about climate action. In his theory of deliberative democracy, the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas (1929-) provides a framework within which democratic processes can distinguish between the different dimensions of discourse – scientific-pragmatic and moral-political. In the context of climate change, this means that there are pathways to address the problem that don’t require scientific or technical expertise, and that are geared towards tackling the collective issues it raises democratically.”

Aeon, 18 December 2019

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