Posts Tagged ‘science’

healthcare racism

Professor Roianne West is on a mission to achieve equity in our health system. In this article from Hospital and Healthcare Magazine Roianne, winner of the 2020 Lowitja Institute Cranlana Award, talks about the immense task of unravelling racism in Australia’s complex health system.

via Hospital and Healthcare Magazine, 16 October 2020

See More
archaeology ethics

Human bones tell stories that would otherwise be lost to history. But archaeologists are increasingly confronted with demands to let past generations rest in peace.

The ethical debate surrounding archaeologists unearthing and studying human remains is one of long-standing.

In this article Mark Strauss asks why we care so much about the rights of the dead, who, by virtue of their non-living status, have no apparent opinion on the matter?

via National Geographic, 7 April 2016

See More
big data

The world’s first guide on data ethics for brands has been launched to encourage companies to see the vital important of addressing the gap between what they can do and what they should do. For the industry, prioritising people over data is regarded as important for brands’ long-term licence to operate. Data ethics are, however, more than the bottom line. Big tech firms have come under increasing scrutiny for their collection and use of data, and the impact that’s had on everything from consumer choices in groceries to political candidates. Questions are being raised about who is building the systems, how they’re using the data and who gets to make these decisions.

August 2020

See More
philosophy

Where our scientific knowledge is insufficient and where theological answers fail to compel and convince us, philosophy remains a useful endeavour.

That doesn’t mean that all philosophising done at the frontier is useful, interesting, or worth listening to, however. Philosophy that is ignorant of science, or of the bizarre and arcane logical rules that science can often follow, will lead even the most brilliant of thinkers astray. To the speculative, curious mind, however, what is known today will never be satisfactory. Until science makes those critical advances, philosophising will be a necessary tool for gazing beyond today’s frontier.

Which is why Cranlana’s programs draw on more than two millennia of philosophical thinking to foster in-depth, practical discussions that sharpen critical reasoning and strengthen moral courage.

Forbes, 30 June 2020

See More
machine learning

Does AI—and, more specifically, conscious AI—deserve moral rights?

In this video thought exploration, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, ethics and tech professor Joanna Bryson, philosopher and cognitive scientist Susan Schneider, physicist Max Tegmark, philosopher Peter Singer, and bioethicist Glenn Cohen all weigh in on the question of AI rights.

via Big Think, 8 July 2020

See More