Posts Tagged ‘racism’

horizontal leadership

Traditionally, enacting systemic change has been slow and painful. Proponents of change aren’t just up against the obvious and well-defended interests of power and tradition, they’re also battling system justification, the non-conscious tendency to defend, bolster and justify aspects of the societal status quo.

In response to these seemingly insurmountable problems, and in an effort to effect change at a rate faster than the current glacial pace, many grass-roots movements have emerged, from Occupy Wallstreet in 2011 to the Black Lives Matter movement and Extinction Rebellion. These movements offer a way for individuals without the power to effect change on their own to come together as a powerful force to challenge the entrenched status quo. Unlike protest movements of the past, these have embraced a non-hierarchical approach to organisation and leadership. Sometimes described as leaderless movements, it would perhaps be more accurate to describe them as having coordinated decentralised leadership, or horizontal leadership.

September 2020

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diversity women in leadership

Leadership groups with people from mixed backgrounds, ethnicity and gender do better because “they challenge more, and they have more discussion and debate and that leads to better decision-making,” says Vanda Murray OBE.

New research has revealed that London-listed companies where women make up more than one in three executive roles have a profit margin more than 10 times greater than those without.

via BBC, 27 July 2020

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cancel culture

There are risks to shutting down opinions we disagree with.

Hugh Breakey, President, Australian Association for Professional & Applied Ethics, says “Seeing mistaken views as intolerable speech carries genuine ethical costs.”

In the wake of an open letter signed by 150 high-profile authors, commentators and scholars claiming that “open debate and toleration of differences” are under attack, Breakey considers the ethical concerns around derailing of debates and silencing of opinions.

via The Conversation, 10 July 2020

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diversity and inclusion

It goes without saying that inclusive leadership will support more inclusive organisations, but are leaders prepared to make the hard decisions necessary to adapt to the realities of inclusion?

Modernising leadership, in the face of a new age of racial equality, will inevitably require changes to the composition of leadership teams.

Organisational activity to dismantle racism will necessarily involve work at leadership level to address how it approaches diversity, and inclusion, within its own ranks.

via Forbes, 4 August 2020

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archaeology ethics

Human bones tell stories that would otherwise be lost to history. But archaeologists are increasingly confronted with demands to let past generations rest in peace.

The ethical debate surrounding archaeologists unearthing and studying human remains is one of long-standing.

In this article Mark Strauss asks why we care so much about the rights of the dead, who, by virtue of their non-living status, have no apparent opinion on the matter?

via National Geographic, 7 April 2016

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