Posts Tagged ‘medicine’

coronavirus pandemic

There has been, and will continue to be, much written during this coronavirus outbreak about the application of ethics to the decision-making processes in hospitals, the halls of power and the institutions which have traditionally shaped our lives – public and private. Our CEO Vanessa Pigrum and Lead Moderator Peter Mares have both written on these topics.

We’ve already shared some articles and pod-casts on these topics – you can find them on our site in the news and alumni curated content pages, and our social channels. As the impact of the outbreak shows no sign of lessening in the immediate future, and the volume of content on current and future virus-related issues grows, we will be gathering some of the more thought-provoking pieces here as they are published. Please revisit periodically to read or listen to newly added thought pieces.

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bio-ethics research

Bioethicists often refer to four basic ethical principles when evaluating the merits and difficulties of medical procedures and research – autonomy, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence. What happens when you’re not sure whether the research you’re doing is breaching one or more of the bio-ethics principles?

Big Think, 23 October 2019

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An illustration from the atlas shows a man's partially dissected cheek

The innocuous-sounding Pernkopf Topographic Anatomy of Man is described by Rabbi Joseph Polak, a Holocaust survivor and professor of health law, as a “moral enigma” because it is derived from “real evil, but can be used in the service of good”. Also known as Pernkopf’s Atlas, and considered to be the best example of anatomical drawings in the world, it’s no longer in print because the book’s findings came from the bodies of hundreds of people killed by the Nazis. The book’s dark past has meant scientists have grappled with the ethics involved in its use. Under what circumstances, if any, could these images be used in the service of healing?

BBC, 19 August 2019

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