Posts Tagged ‘medicine’

female political leaders

A new study has revealed countries with male leaders who have prioritised the economy in their COVID-19 response have seen many more deaths from the virus than countries with female leaders who have focused on public health.

In their report, the authors argue there are “both contingent and structural reasons that may explain these stark differences”.

Vanessa Pigrum, CEO of Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, has some thoughts on why this might be the case.

“These women have, like all leaders, had to make difficult decisions quickly, in an unprecedented and rapidly changing situation,” says Pigrum. “These decisions have had enormous consequences. They’ve slowed the spread of the virus and saved lives, but in doing so have economically impacted millions of people. Acknowledging these hardships with emotional courage, communicating with clarity and empathy, and calmly engaging in an authentic way with their constituents engenders public confidence.”

While an ability to maintain integrity throughout turmoil is certainly not unique to female leadership, Pigrum suggests how these female leaders got to be where they are may have affected their leadership style. “The traits of ethical leadership are the same regardless of gender or age, but the expression of those traits might be affected by whether those leaders followed a traditional path to authority,” she says.

via MindFood, 21 July 2020

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The Lowitja Institute has named leading Aboriginal academic Professor Roianne West as the winner of the 2020 Lowitja Institute Cranlana Award for outstanding research leadership.

The national award honours excellence from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers whose contributions to their academic field are recognised nationally and internationally, and who have contributed significantly to the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Congratulations Professor West, we look forward to welcoming you to the Executive Colloquium.

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coronavirus pandemic

There has been, and will continue to be, much written during this coronavirus outbreak about the application of ethics to the decision-making processes in hospitals, the halls of power and the institutions which have traditionally shaped our lives – public and private. Our CEO Vanessa Pigrum and Lead Moderator Peter Mares have both written on these topics.

We’ve already shared some articles and pod-casts on these topics – you can find them on our site in the news and alumni curated content pages, and our social channels. As the impact of the outbreak shows no sign of lessening in the immediate future, and the volume of content on current and future virus-related issues grows, we will be gathering some of the more thought-provoking pieces here as they are published. Please revisit periodically to read or listen to newly added thought pieces.

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covid19

There have been a number of articles written, including by our CEO, on the approaches healthcare professionals could and should adopt when making decisions about the allocation of scarce resources during crises.

All draw on key philosophical concepts to define what is just. There are a number of lenses through which to view the issues such as utlitiarianism, contractualism, egalitarianism and virtue ethics. However, there are no rules or guidelines which will provide absolute certainty in extraordinary situations. When it comes to the crunch, individuals in leadership positions and on the front line must make the best decisions they can.

All leaders must be prepared to face, at some point, unforeseen and complex challenges. While the current crisis is an extreme example, these are not the times to start thinking about your own personal ethics and convictions. Confidently making decisions at such times requires leaders to already have a strong, well developed ethical framework upon which to build their thinking. For their own benefit, and because, ultimately, the community needs to rely on the judgement of its leaders, and trust that they have our best interests at heart.

via The Atlantic and ABC, 11 & 18 March 2020

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