Posts Tagged ‘justice’

housing

The second of a 12-part series CBD News is running, attempting to explore the role that housing can and should play within Australian society and why it is important to our economy that we house all Australians, rich or poor. Peter Mares, author of “No Place Like Home” and lead moderator at the Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, was asked to share his thoughts on why housing all Australians should be considered an economic imperative for Australia.

via CBD News, 27 August 2020

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archaeology ethics

Human bones tell stories that would otherwise be lost to history. But archaeologists are increasingly confronted with demands to let past generations rest in peace.

The ethical debate surrounding archaeologists unearthing and studying human remains is one of long-standing.

In this article Mark Strauss asks why we care so much about the rights of the dead, who, by virtue of their non-living status, have no apparent opinion on the matter?

via National Geographic, 7 April 2016

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black lives matter, racism

We at Cranlana stand alongside the indigenous community of Australia and the Black Lives Matter movement. Like millions of others, we have watched the events triggered by George Floyd’s death with grief, but alarmingly not with surprise. George Floyd’s asphyxiation was a shocking and despicable event, underscored by systemic problems which underpin the societies we live in. Here at home, more than 400 indigenous Australians have died in custody since 1991. Government enquiries and royal commissions have followed. And yet, seemingly nothing changes. The global reactions to George Floyd’s death have highlighted how pervasive systemic biases are. They’re built into the fabric of how we operate – into our economies, our laws and our philosophies. Cranlana Centre commits to using our position to challenge and change these systems; to seek out, learn from and amplify voices which haven’t had access to power; not to let this moment be yet another brief flare of emotion which precedes a return to normal; and to work alongside the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to turn good intentions about change into sustained action. We have always had a commitment to bringing about positive change. Yet we know we can do more. This moment is a wake-up call for all of us who can influence systemic change to do so, however you can.

You can find here a list of resources for a deeper understanding of systemic injustice

9 June 2020

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