Posts Tagged ‘innovation’

ethical boards

Are you contemplating joining a Board? Perhaps you’re taking up your first board role this year. Or are you an old hand, and member of many? Board membership can be prestigious, and a chance to support an organisation you believe in. By lending your experience and wisdom you can make a significant impact. It can be professionally and personally satisfying. It can also be a risk to your reputation and legacy if that Board or organisation misbehaves.

1 February 2020

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ethical leadership

Leaders, believe it or not, you don’t know everything. And not only is that OK, but your employees already know it—so one of the most important things you can do is acknowledge it. So says Vanessa Pigrum, CEO of Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership at Monash University.

via Venture Magazine, 23 November 2020

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open mind

The Japanese Zen term shoshin translates as ‘beginner’s mind’ and refers to a paradox: the more you know about a subject, the more likely you are to close your mind to further learning. As the Zen monk Shunryu Suzuki put it in his book Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind (1970): ‘In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.’

Approaching issues with a beginner’s mind or a healthy dose of intellectual humility can help to counter the disadvantages of intellectual hubris. People who are more intellectually humble actually know more, presumably because they are more receptive to new information. Similarly, being intellectually humble is associated with open-mindedness and a greater willingness to be receptive to other people’s perspectives – arguably just the tonic that our politically febrile world needs today.

via Psyche, 27 August 2020

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fractured workforce

How do leaders bring together a physically and psychologically fractured workforce? Compassion and humanity will be key at all levels.
Organisations of all sizes and across all sectors and regions have such a disparity of employee experiences of the pandemic that creating a sense of “oneness” is a formidable task.
Pre-existing schisms have been made more visible and more profound by this crisis. But beyond that, the average workforce will contain a vast spectrum of pandemic experiences.
This uniqueness of experience challenges the concept of fairness. How can you be fair and consistent when the spectrum of needs varies so dramatically? Should you even try?

Fast Company, 18 July 2020

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