Posts Tagged ‘human rights’

horizontal leadership

Traditionally, enacting systemic change has been slow and painful. Proponents of change aren’t just up against the obvious and well-defended interests of power and tradition, they’re also battling system justification, the non-conscious tendency to defend, bolster and justify aspects of the societal status quo.

In response to these seemingly insurmountable problems, and in an effort to effect change at a rate faster than the current glacial pace, many grass-roots movements have emerged, from Occupy Wallstreet in 2011 to the Black Lives Matter movement and Extinction Rebellion. These movements offer a way for individuals without the power to effect change on their own to come together as a powerful force to challenge the entrenched status quo. Unlike protest movements of the past, these have embraced a non-hierarchical approach to organisation and leadership. Sometimes described as leaderless movements, it would perhaps be more accurate to describe them as having coordinated decentralised leadership, or horizontal leadership.

September 2020

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supply chain

Powerful as it is, the supply chain metaphor draws our attention away from the larger forces that shape the problems we should be tackling. These include the sustainability of current consumption patterns; the absence of economic alternatives; weak regulatory oversight; scant protection for whistleblowers and journalists; the ease with which corporate ownership can be hidden and disguised; and the commercial pressures and incentives that likely drive those profiting from abuses or taking shortcuts. Our efforts to build stronger and more resilient supply chains will get us only so far. The thing we’re trying to perfect is only an image, and a partial one at that. Alternative visions can help us return these broader issues to the debate, while reminding us, for example, of the importance of engaging everyone affected by global supply chains in the discussion of how they should be organised.

via Aeon Media, 11 September 2020

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housing

A $7.7 billion investment to build 30,000 homes and repair thousands more would raise economic output by $15.7 billion.

Peter Mares, Cranlana Centre’s Lead Moderator, says that as we mark the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, the pandemic calls for a level of nation building ambition similar to 1945 — when the urgent need to build housing as part of post-war reconstruction forged the first 10-year Commonwealth-state housing agreement.

In the subsequent decades housing policy involved similar agreements, with the federal government funding the states to build social housing. Over the past 25 years we have dropped the ball. Now is the time to pick it up again.

via Crikey Inq, 31 August 2020

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housing

The second of a 12-part series CBD News is running, attempting to explore the role that housing can and should play within Australian society and why it is important to our economy that we house all Australians, rich or poor. Peter Mares, author of “No Place Like Home” and lead moderator at the Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, was asked to share his thoughts on why housing all Australians should be considered an economic imperative for Australia.

via CBD News, 27 August 2020

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machine learning

Does AI—and, more specifically, conscious AI—deserve moral rights?

In this video thought exploration, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, ethics and tech professor Joanna Bryson, philosopher and cognitive scientist Susan Schneider, physicist Max Tegmark, philosopher Peter Singer, and bioethicist Glenn Cohen all weigh in on the question of AI rights.

via Big Think, 8 July 2020

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