Posts Tagged ‘government’

female political leaders

A new study has revealed countries with male leaders who have prioritised the economy in their COVID-19 response have seen many more deaths from the virus than countries with female leaders who have focused on public health.

In their report, the authors argue there are “both contingent and structural reasons that may explain these stark differences”.

Vanessa Pigrum, CEO of Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, has some thoughts on why this might be the case.

“These women have, like all leaders, had to make difficult decisions quickly, in an unprecedented and rapidly changing situation,” says Pigrum. “These decisions have had enormous consequences. They’ve slowed the spread of the virus and saved lives, but in doing so have economically impacted millions of people. Acknowledging these hardships with emotional courage, communicating with clarity and empathy, and calmly engaging in an authentic way with their constituents engenders public confidence.”

While an ability to maintain integrity throughout turmoil is certainly not unique to female leadership, Pigrum suggests how these female leaders got to be where they are may have affected their leadership style. “The traits of ethical leadership are the same regardless of gender or age, but the expression of those traits might be affected by whether those leaders followed a traditional path to authority,” she says.

via MindFood, 21 July 2020

See More
democracy

In a poll last month 45% of Australians said the main purpose of our democracy is ensuring all people are treated fairly and equally, including the most vulnerable. Which is why, says Travers McLeod, CEO Centre for Policy Development and Cranlana moderator, Australians are uneasy about outsourcing essential services.

Recent history hasn’t been good for outsourced services, from quarantine hotels to the aged care sector, so as we face the biggest labour market disruption in a generation government needs to be an active player in service delivery.

via The Australian, 13 July 2020

See More

The pandemic has brought grey-zone dilemmas into focus, but in truth they are always with us. Thankfully, rules, guidelines and codes of conduct make many everyday choices clear— I don’t have to think about what side of the road to drive on or what speed to drive at. But it is impossible to devise a rule to cover every situation, nor would it be desirable to do so.

Doing a good job of being human requires us to develop the capacity to make good judgements, both in our work and in our personal life. It is a capacity that is enhanced by being open to new information and to different points of view. It is a capacity that requires us to be alert to our tendency to make decisions that benefit us personally, even when we are convinced that we are being entirely objective.

via Profile magazine, June 2020

See More
public policy

Australians had become used to walking past rough sleepers. Policymakers too, seemed unmoved by the people huddled in doorways or sheltering in parks under plastic sheets. That’s until the COVID-19 pandemic rendered rough sleepers visible, because we’ve all been told to stay home and anyone without a home presents a risk of passing on the virus. Hal Pawson and Cranlana Lead Moderator Peter Mares explore the five major vulnerabilities this crisis has laid bare.

The Conversation, 12 May 2020

See More