Posts Tagged ‘gender’

recruitment ethics

Cranlana Centre CEO Vanessa Pigrum says organisations need to consider the ethics of their recruitment process, and how it’s experienced by unsuccessful candidates. That experience will be shared widely, so it’s not only right but wise to make it a good one.

via Recruitment Marketing Magazine, 26 March 2021

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inclusive team

Diversity is more than just a corporate buzzword. For meaningful change within our offices, inclusion is key. Here, Carol Innes, Manager Aboriginal Cultural Heritage & Arts Development WA, Co-Chair Reconciliation WA and an alumna of Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, reveals how leaders can foster inclusivity

via Marie Claire, 18 March 2021

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Striving to increase workplace diversity is not an empty slogan – it’s a good business decision. Multiple studies have shown the financial benefits of a diverse management team. In recent years a body of research has revealed another, more nuanced benefit of workplace diversity: nonhomogenous teams are simply smarter. Working with people who are different from you may challenge your brain to overcome its stale ways of thinking and sharpen its performance.

via Harvard Business Review, 4 November 2016

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female political leaders

A new study has revealed countries with male leaders who have prioritised the economy in their COVID-19 response have seen many more deaths from the virus than countries with female leaders who have focused on public health.

In their report, the authors argue there are “both contingent and structural reasons that may explain these stark differences”.

Vanessa Pigrum, CEO of Cranlana Centre for Ethical Leadership, has some thoughts on why this might be the case.

“These women have, like all leaders, had to make difficult decisions quickly, in an unprecedented and rapidly changing situation,” says Pigrum. “These decisions have had enormous consequences. They’ve slowed the spread of the virus and saved lives, but in doing so have economically impacted millions of people. Acknowledging these hardships with emotional courage, communicating with clarity and empathy, and calmly engaging in an authentic way with their constituents engenders public confidence.”

While an ability to maintain integrity throughout turmoil is certainly not unique to female leadership, Pigrum suggests how these female leaders got to be where they are may have affected their leadership style. “The traits of ethical leadership are the same regardless of gender or age, but the expression of those traits might be affected by whether those leaders followed a traditional path to authority,” she says.

via MindFood, 21 July 2020

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