Posts Tagged ‘compliance’

corporate evil

Patterns appear and reappear in corporate-misconduct cases, beginning with fantastic commitments made from on high. All of which place personnel in a position of extreme strain. Even without strain, people tend to underestimate the probability of future bad events. Put them under emotional stress, some research suggests, and this tendency gets amplified. People will favour decisions that preempt short-term social discomfort even at the cost of heightened long-term risk. This reaction isn’t excusable. But it is predictable.

via The Atlantic, January/February 2016

See More
ethical Australia

This episode of the ABC’s Q+A looks at accountability, ethics and leadership. With public trust in our politicians and institutions like the banks at an all-time low, how do we achieve a more ethical Australia? Could we embed ethics into all levels of society? What are the principles you try to live by, and do you see them reflected in national institutions?

via Q+A, ABC, 26 October 2020

See More
integrity

In this podcast Richard Bistrong, CEO of Front-Line Anti-Bribery, talks about how leaders and organisations need to navigate the tension between the pressure to succeed and the pressure to comply. How we can make the values on the wall operational in the business. Why we should encourage conversations about real-world ethical dilemmas. Why middle managers have a crucial role in whether the message and culture of ethics will be amplified, distorted, discarded, or discounted on the front-lines.

via Leading Transformational Change, October 2020

See More
supply chain

Powerful as it is, the supply chain metaphor draws our attention away from the larger forces that shape the problems we should be tackling. These include the sustainability of current consumption patterns; the absence of economic alternatives; weak regulatory oversight; scant protection for whistleblowers and journalists; the ease with which corporate ownership can be hidden and disguised; and the commercial pressures and incentives that likely drive those profiting from abuses or taking shortcuts. Our efforts to build stronger and more resilient supply chains will get us only so far. The thing we’re trying to perfect is only an image, and a partial one at that. Alternative visions can help us return these broader issues to the debate, while reminding us, for example, of the importance of engaging everyone affected by global supply chains in the discussion of how they should be organised.

via Aeon Media, 11 September 2020

See More
ethical fade

Ethical fading is a legitimate business risk. It occurs when the ethical aspects disappear from the decision-making process and happens when people focus heavily on some other aspect of a decision, such as profit. CEOs and executive teams may focus on compliance, but other competing priorities within the company might influence the final decision. That can lead to court, and penalties. Fines can convert ethical issues into business problems by attaching a price tag to them.

This piece draws lessons from the case of Carnival Corp. and its subsidiary Princess Cruise Lines, which were initially fined $40 million for dumping waste, and then another $20 million for violating their probation terms, by the US Department of Justice.

Via Markkula Centre for Applied Ethics, Santa Clara University, 24 June 2019

See More