Posts Tagged ‘civil rights’

diversity women in leadership

Leadership groups with people from mixed backgrounds, ethnicity and gender do better because “they challenge more, and they have more discussion and debate and that leads to better decision-making,” says Vanda Murray OBE.

New research has revealed that London-listed companies where women make up more than one in three executive roles have a profit margin more than 10 times greater than those without.

via BBC, 27 July 2020

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diversity and inclusion

It goes without saying that inclusive leadership will support more inclusive organisations, but are leaders prepared to make the hard decisions necessary to adapt to the realities of inclusion?

Modernising leadership, in the face of a new age of racial equality, will inevitably require changes to the composition of leadership teams.

Organisational activity to dismantle racism will necessarily involve work at leadership level to address how it approaches diversity, and inclusion, within its own ranks.

via Forbes, 4 August 2020

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Homelessness Week

As the Covid-19 pandemic set in, state and territory governments around Australia rapidly found crisis accommodation — usually in hotels — for around 7000 people who were sleeping rough. But the impressive speed and resolve raised a difficult question: what happens next?

The federal government has a unique opportunity to begin reshaping Australia’s housing landscape in the October budget. Lead Moderator Peter Mares explores what lessons we can learn from Finland’s successful adoption of the ‘housing first’ model.

Inside Story, 4 August 2020

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machine learning

Does AI—and, more specifically, conscious AI—deserve moral rights?

In this video thought exploration, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, ethics and tech professor Joanna Bryson, philosopher and cognitive scientist Susan Schneider, physicist Max Tegmark, philosopher Peter Singer, and bioethicist Glenn Cohen all weigh in on the question of AI rights.

via Big Think, 8 July 2020

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black lives matter, racism

We at Cranlana stand alongside the indigenous community of Australia and the Black Lives Matter movement. Like millions of others, we have watched the events triggered by George Floyd’s death with grief, but alarmingly not with surprise. George Floyd’s asphyxiation was a shocking and despicable event, underscored by systemic problems which underpin the societies we live in. Here at home, more than 400 indigenous Australians have died in custody since 1991. Government enquiries and royal commissions have followed. And yet, seemingly nothing changes. The global reactions to George Floyd’s death have highlighted how pervasive systemic biases are. They’re built into the fabric of how we operate – into our economies, our laws and our philosophies. Cranlana Centre commits to using our position to challenge and change these systems; to seek out, learn from and amplify voices which haven’t had access to power; not to let this moment be yet another brief flare of emotion which precedes a return to normal; and to work alongside the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to turn good intentions about change into sustained action. We have always had a commitment to bringing about positive change. Yet we know we can do more. This moment is a wake-up call for all of us who can influence systemic change to do so, however you can.

You can find here a list of resources for a deeper understanding of systemic injustice

9 June 2020

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