Alumni Curated Content

Alumni Curated Content – Any posts marked with this category will only appear in the Alumni Section

diversity equals success

A world-first study, based on six years of Australian companies’ gender reporting to the federal Workplace Gender Equality Agency, has identified the causal role between greater gender diversity and business success.

It established that companies who appointed a female CEO increased their market value by 5 per cent — worth nearly $80 million to an average ASX200 company.

“If you’re a member of a board or a CEO or executive and you don’t take notice of what this report is telling you, then you are not meeting your obligation to your shareholders or your owners,” says WGEA Director Libby Lyons

via ABC, 19 June 2020

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black lives matter

Scholars and activists have debated how effective empathy is as a tool for behaviour change—particularly when it comes to fighting racism. Paul Bloom argues that empathy allows our bias to drive our decision-making, bell hooks states that empathy is not a promising avenue to systemic racial change, and Alisha Gaines analyzes how an overemphasis on racial empathy in a 1944 landmark study, “An American Dilemma,” led to a blindness about the impact of systemic and institutional racial barriers. This more general understanding and application of empathy has not been an effective aid to fighting systemic oppression.
Bethany Gordon posits that a more nuanced understanding of empathy—and its related concepts—may help us use it more effectively in the fight against racism. There are two strains of empathy that are relevant and can help us better understand (and possibly change) our response: empathic distress and empathic concern, also known as compassion.

via Behavioural Scientist, 15 June 2020

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Bernie Wise, Senior Manager, Disputes & Customer Advocacy, found the Vincent Fairfax Fellowship made her more effective at embedding a culture of ethics and getting that across to her teams and the broader business. “Ethics in business has been in the spotlight over the past few years. It’s all about the question: what do you do when no one’s looking? That’s what I think ethics is – doing the right thing even when no one is watching”

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covid-19

Umang Kumar responds to Italian Philosopher Giorgio Agamben’s philosophical protests against the restrictions introduced in response to Covid-19, and finds Agamben’s distinctions between “bare life” and the “good life worth living” deeply problematic. Focussing on this distinction is a luxury a Western philosopher might have, but for many the bare life and the good life are intertwined.

via Madras Courier, 28 May 2020

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virtue ethics

Discussions of ethics tend to focus on matters of conscious choice: which moral rules to follow, or advice on how to approach moral dilemmas. But a hugely significant part of ethics concerns what is unthinkable. You might, for example, be strapped for cash, but robbing the neighbours is unlikely to be an option for you. That’s because, whenever you deliberate, you have already ruled out all kinds of unthinkable possibilities. Some because you can’t contemplate them, some because you’re genuinely not aware of them.

Which brings virtues that by their nature restrict thought and imagination into tension with the prevailing spirit of the internet which operates on the principle that everything should be viewable and thinkable.

via Aeon Media, 17 May 2019

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