Curated Content for Alumni

Articles, podcasts and thought pieces relevant to Cranlana alumni and Fellows.

What Points to a Great Leader?

Billionaire Warren Buffett advises leaders when selecting top talent to most keenly value integrity of all traits.

“We look for three things when we hire people. We look for intelligence, we look for initiative or energy, and we look for integrity. And if they don’t have the latter, the first two will kill you, because if you’re going to get someone without integrity, you want them lazy and dumb.”

This article explored six fundamental traits embodied by leaders with integrity.

Inc, 6 February 2020

Ta-Nehisi Coates on The Case for Reparations

“The question really is not whether we’ll be tied to the somethings of our past, but whether we are courageous enough to be tied to the whole of them.” In his opening statement in the US to a House hearing on H.R. 40, a bill that would establish a commission to study reparations, Ta-nehisi Coates’ argument that ‘Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole’ has resonance in Australia, and will be familiar to Executive Colloquium participants who grapple with the realities, responsibilities and consequences of slavery and civil rights through the writings of Gribble, Martin Luther King, Jr and Stan Grant, among others.

The Atlantic, 19 June 2019

Are Ethics Holding Women Back in Science?

Physicists are more likely to describe women as ethical scientists, but in ways that potentially limit their productivity and competitiveness according to a paper published in Science and Engineering Ethics.

Inside Higher Ed, 24 February 2017

Goldman Sachs Recognises the Importance of Board Diversity

Recognising the benefits of board diversity, Goldman Sachs has announced that, from 1 July 2020, it won’t take any company public unless it has at least one “diverse” board member in 2020, and two in 2021.

New York Post, 23 January 2020

Australia Day Honours 2020

This year twelve Cranlana Centre alumni were awarded Australia Day Honours, recognising their contribution to building a just, prosperous and sustainable society. We offer our warmest congratulations to each on these well deserved awards.

adaptive change

The Work of Leadership

Companies today face adaptive challenges. Changes in societies, markets, customers, competition, and technology around the globe are forcing organizations to clarify their values, develop new strategies, and learn new ways of operating. Adaptive problems are often systemic problems with no ready answers.

Harvard Business Review, December 2001

Marital infidelity and professional misconduct are linked

A well developed ethical framework encompasses both the professional and personal. Knowing what you stand for and what you will allow is vital. For leaders taking strong stances on issues such as sexual misconduct in the workplace there could be the extra benefit of contributing to more ethical corporate culture in general, as suggested by a 2019 study which showed a link between marital infidelity and professional misconduct.

Science Daily, 30 July 2019

For Leaders, Decency Is Just as Important as Intelligence

Successful leaders today and in the decades to come must possess triple-threat leadership capability: IQ+EQ+DQ. In other words, they must possess a combination of two familiar attributes — intellect and emotional intelligence — and one that I believe must be recognized and elevated: decency.” Bill Boulding Dean of Duke University – The Fuqua School of Business

Harvard Business Review, 16 July 2019

diversity inclusian bias

How to Counteract 3 Types of Bias and Run Inclusive Meetings

Companies which are robustly diverse report growing market share 45% more often than their more homogeneous counterparts and are 70% more likely to capture a new market. Varied perspectives, thought patterns and problem-solving approaches produce better solutions. Fostering inclusive meetings to get maximum benefits of diversity is a competitive advantage. Do you know how?

Atlassian, 2019

bio-ethics research

Mini-brains May Already Be Sentient and Suffering, Scientists Warn.

Bioethicists often refer to four basic ethical principles when evaluating the merits and difficulties of medical procedures and research – autonomy, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence. What happens when you’re not sure whether the research you’re doing is breaching one or more of the bio-ethics principles?

Big Think, 23 October 2019

climate change as an ethical imperative

9 in 10 Australians See Action on Climate Change as an Ethical Imperative for Business Leaders

The 2019 Ethics Index quantifies the perceptions of adult Australians of the overall importance of ethics, and what the actual level of ethical behaviour is, within Australian society, examining various sectors, organisations, occupations, issues and influences across. On Climate Change the message for business leaders is clear – Australians believe they have an urgent ethical obligation to act.

Lawyers Weekly, December 2019

AI driverless cars machine learning

A Study on Driverless-Car Ethics Offers a Troubling Look Into Our Values

Autonomous cars will be required to make value judgments which must be pre-programmed. What should we tell them to do? To understand decisions human drivers would make before determining the ethical decisions that cars should make, researchers crowdsourced the question by launching a game called Moral Machine in which players are presented with a version of the trolley problem. The results suggest that if billions of driverless cars in the future are all programmed to make the same judgement call, it may be a lot more dangerous for some people to cross the street than others.

The New Yorker, 24 January 2019

Overcoming the Isolation of Leadership

Do you take yourself out of your comfort zone often enough? Alumna Kate Chaney, Director of Innovation and Strategy for Anglicare WA, believes that is what’s required to truly innovate. In this article she discusses the benefits of Cranlana for her thinking and leadership. She and Chief Executive (and fellow alumnus) Mark Glasson have made Cranlana “an integral part of the journey for Anglicare WA’s leadership”, with the learnings inherent to their strategic processes.

Business News Western Australia, 17 April 2019

climate change science

How can Habermas help us think about climate change?

Emilie Prattico offers a framework for action on climate change – justice and deliberation are as important as the science. “While the requirement for scientific and technical expertise about climate change cannot be denied, there are ways to reconcile this reality with the needs for inclusive, democratic processes about climate action. In his theory of deliberative democracy, the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas (1929-) provides a framework within which democratic processes can distinguish between the different dimensions of discourse – scientific-pragmatic and moral-political. In the context of climate change, this means that there are pathways to address the problem that don’t require scientific or technical expertise, and that are geared towards tackling the collective issues it raises democratically.”

Aeon, 18 December 2019

climate change inequality

Ex-Unilever boss seeks ‘heroic CEOs’ to tackle climate change and inequality

Paul Polman, former CEO of Unilever, is calling on “heroic chief executives willing to step up and move outside of the comfort zone and take personal risks” to drive change in the face of political inaction. “We are now at a point in society where the cost of not acting in these areas is higher than acting.”

The Guardian, 21 July 2019

aquaculture octopus

Millions of People Eat Octopus – Here’s Why We Shouldn’t

There is a wealth of research that suggests octopuses are one of the most complex and intelligent animals in the ocean. They can recognise individual human faces, solve problems (and remember the answers for months) and there is some evidence they experience pain and suffering. They are the only invertebrate that the 2012 Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness considers sentient alongside mammals and birds. They are also a culinary delicacy with growing demand, but scientists say farming them is not only unethical but extremely damaging to the environment.

weforum 19 May 2019

Twelve Reasons Why Ethical Leadership is Important in Business

What is ethical leadership, and why is it important? The Center for Ethical Leadership put it best when they said, “Ethical leadership is knowing your core values and having the courage to live them in all parts of your life in service of the common good.” Here are twelve different ways ethical leadership can make a positive impact on a business and why it’s so important.

Center for Management & Organization Effectiveness

An illustration from the atlas shows a man's partially dissected cheek

Eduard Pernkopf: The Nazi book of anatomy still used by surgeons

The innocuous-sounding Pernkopf Topographic Anatomy of Man is described by Rabbi Joseph Polak, a Holocaust survivor and professor of health law, as a “moral enigma” because it is derived from “real evil, but can be used in the service of good”. Also known as Pernkopf’s Atlas, and considered to be the best example of anatomical drawings in the world, it’s no longer in print because the book’s findings came from the bodies of hundreds of people killed by the Nazis. The book’s dark past has meant scientists have grappled with the ethics involved in its use. Under what circumstances, if any, could these images be used in the service of healing?

BBC, 19 August 2019