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Curated Content for Alumni

Articles, podcasts and thought pieces relevant to Cranlana alumni and Fellows.

diversity inclusian bias

How to Counteract 3 Types of Bias and Run Inclusive Meetings

Companies which are robustly diverse report growing market share 45% more often than their more homogeneous counterparts and are 70% more likely to capture a new market. Varied perspectives, thought patterns and problem-solving approaches produce better solutions. Fostering inclusive meetings to get maximum benefits of diversity is a competitive advantage. Do you know how?

Atlassian, 2019

bio-ethics research

Mini-brains May Already Be Sentient and Suffering, Scientists Warn.

Bioethicists often refer to four basic ethical principles when evaluating the merits and difficulties of medical procedures and research – autonomy, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence. What happens when you’re not sure whether the research you’re doing is breaching one or more of the bio-ethics principles?

Big Think, 23 October 2019

climate change as an ethical imperative

9 in 10 Australians See Action on Climate Change as an Ethical Imperative for Business Leaders

The 2019 Ethics Index quantifies the perceptions of adult Australians of the overall importance of ethics, and what the actual level of ethical behaviour is, within Australian society, examining various sectors, organisations, occupations, issues and influences across. On Climate Change the message for business leaders is clear – Australians believe they have an urgent ethical obligation to act.

Lawyers Weekly, December 2019

AI driverless cars machine learning

A Study on Driverless-Car Ethics Offers a Troubling Look Into Our Values

Autonomous cars will be required to make value judgments which must be pre-programmed. What should we tell them to do? To understand decisions human drivers would make before determining the ethical decisions that cars should make, researchers crowdsourced the question by launching a game called Moral Machine in which players are presented with a version of the trolley problem. The results suggest that if billions of driverless cars in the future are all programmed to make the same judgement call, it may be a lot more dangerous for some people to cross the street than others.

The New Yorker, 24 January 2019

Overcoming the Isolation of Leadership

Do you take yourself out of your comfort zone often enough? Alumna Kate Chaney, Director of Innovation and Strategy for Anglicare WA, believes that is what’s required to truly innovate. In this article she discusses the benefits of Cranlana for her thinking and leadership. She and Chief Executive (and fellow alumnus) Mark Glasson have made Cranlana “an integral part of the journey for Anglicare WA’s leadership”, with the learnings inherent to their strategic processes.

Business News Western Australia, 17 April 2019

climate change science

How can Habermas help us think about climate change?

Emilie Prattico offers a framework for action on climate change – justice and deliberation are as important as the science. “While the requirement for scientific and technical expertise about climate change cannot be denied, there are ways to reconcile this reality with the needs for inclusive, democratic processes about climate action. In his theory of deliberative democracy, the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas (1929-) provides a framework within which democratic processes can distinguish between the different dimensions of discourse – scientific-pragmatic and moral-political. In the context of climate change, this means that there are pathways to address the problem that don’t require scientific or technical expertise, and that are geared towards tackling the collective issues it raises democratically.”

Aeon, 18 December 2019

climate change inequality

Ex-Unilever boss seeks ‘heroic CEOs’ to tackle climate change and inequality

Paul Polman, former CEO of Unilever, is calling on “heroic chief executives willing to step up and move outside of the comfort zone and take personal risks” to drive change in the face of political inaction. “We are now at a point in society where the cost of not acting in these areas is higher than acting.”

The Guardian, 21 July 2019

Maintaining Integrity Through Turmoil

While structural change is relatively common in the public sector – almost every new government makes their mark in some way – it doesn’t make the upheaval and turmoil any easier on those affected. CEO Vanessa Pigrum offers three steps to help public servants examine the situation, navigate a path through the uncertainty and find clarity of purpose.

Government News, 16 December 2019

climate cha

The Problem with Saying “Don’t Bring Me Problems, Bring Me Solutions”

Sabina Nawaz says it’s time to retire the saying “Don’t bring me problems, bring me solutions.” Even though advocates of this approach believe it reduces complaining, increases empowerment, helps employees manage up, and boosts careers, it’s fraught with challenges.

Harvard Business Review, 1 September 2017

40 Under 40: Most Influential Asian-Australian Awards

Congratulations to alumnus Philip Le Liu on being named winner of the Public Sector/Government category in the 40 Under 40: Most Influential Asian-Australian Awards at the inaugural Asian-Australian Leadership Summit. The Asian Executive, 2 December 2019

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